Libya: from political stagnation to civil war?

Libya: from political stagnation to civil war?

Field Marshall Khalifa Haftar’s April attack on Tripoli and the Government of National Accord has deepened the political disintegration of Libya. Foreign powers have at times violently intervened in the country and in other instances pushed for peaceful solutions. Renewed internal fighting has increased competitive pressures externally, potentially undoing the restrictions on oil sales and revenues that previously restrained the antagonists. Moves to gain control of Libya’s hydrocarbon assets and deprive their opponents from controlling them seems to be the logical next step.

Do Egypt’s macroeconomic indicators flatter to deceive?

Do Egypt’s macroeconomic indicators flatter to deceive?

One of the key questions facing Egypt as it emerges from a three-year IMF reform programme is how resilient it will be to any future external shocks. The country’s deal with the IMF has yielded marked improvements to many of its main macroeconomic indicators, which should provide a platform for a sustained period of high growth, underpinned by inflows of foreign direct and indirect investment. However, many of the fundamental weaknesses in the economy persist.

The cost of simplistic power purchase

The cost of simplistic power purchase

Renewable energy deployment is increasingly reliant on independent power producers through power purchase agreements. Yet, off-takers are finding themselves committed to purchasing power at long-term and high prices in a dynamic market, while assuming all the risks. This is an impediment both for expanding renewables and achieving lower electricity prices. Future renewables growth will require a new approach to power purchase agreements as well as investment in mitigating risk and minimising generation costs.