Turkish power sector looks for COVID-19 restructure

Turkish power sector looks for COVID-19 restructure

Jon Gorvett
Once a premium destination for overseas investors, Turkey’s power sector has recently been struggling with the impact of lower-than-expected growth rates, partial market liberalisation and fixed, long-term natural gas contracts. Power generation firms face further stress as the economic impact of the pandemic bites. Efforts to arrange a new debt restructuring deal have been delayed by the virus and wider economic woes, casting uncertainty over future demand. However, the sector retains some high-grade assets, however, which may attract future investor interest.

Iran: a gas giant with feet of clay

Iran: a gas giant with feet of clay

After the re-imposition of US sanctions in 2018 sparked a crash in its oil industry, Iran accelerated production of natural gas and gas condensates and expanded gas exports to neighbouring countries less vulnerable to sanctions. However, domestic obstacles and continued limits on its energy exports have prevented Iran from securing its place as a major gas provider to the region, and it now has another priority for its rising gas output: its downstream sector.

Tunisia: Strong investor interest to energise renewables

Tunisia: Strong investor interest to energise renewables

Attracting investment into its domestic renewable energy sector will remain a priority of the Tunisian government over the coming years in line with its efforts to boost energy security and increase foreign direct investment inflows. The strong growth potential of the market and increasing competition in the global renewable energy sector will ensure the country remains an investment bright spot. Risks remain pertinent, however, given elevated levels of political uncertainty and concerns over the financial stability of the off-taker, STEG.